Awesome Future Novel Idea #8: Space Miners Noir

I am not actually a sci-fi fan. I like Star Wars and like space horror movies, but these just use space as a setting and don’t concern themselves at all with technological progress and its impacts on society.

But a few months back I had been thinking again about how one could make good science fiction stories that are accurate to physics, and played around with various ideas regarding spaceship construction, space stations, space industry, and the implications of post-scarcity societies developing from access to efficient fusion power. I think most futurists are thinking way too fantastical and simply want their jetpacks and Mars colonies, willingly ignoring economy, sociology, and even physics to get there. Looking at what might actually happen is much more interesting to me.

I also have been watching Star Trek: Deep Space Nine for the fourth or fifth time over the last half year, and there were a couple of episodes in the later seasons that seemed really out of place for Star Trek, but still felt quite intriguing to me. One of them has a character visiting her family who owns a big mining company on a lawless border world and are having trouble with the local organized crime. It also is connected to an undercover investigation into organized crime episode from one season earlier. This really doesn’t feel like Star Trek at all, and it was just a 45 minute oneshot with mostly single appearance characters thst were not very well developed. But it had me thinking that I would love to see a whole show just about this family business.

Blade Runner (1982)

I was talking about this with someone and how it had me thinking about the aesthetics of Blade Runner, and he reminded me of the movie Outland. It’s a pretty obscure movie and has been almost entirely forgotten, but I’ve seen it twice over the years and it’s actually pretty good. It has Sean Connery as security chief on an industrial space station investigating a series of suicides by miners who were drugged up to their eyes and corruption in the administration.

Outland (1981)

Even though it’s set on a space station, it has the same very low-tech style of Alien. I’m a sucker not just for 80s fantasy art but for the sci-fi aesthetics of the time as well, and this is exactly the kind of imagery I had in my mind from the start. Like the two Star Trek episodes, both of these movies are really Noir stories. And I also really love Noir. Many Sword & Sorcery stories are fantasy noir stories, and cyberpunk is sci-fi noir. I love this stuff.

Right now I really need to get my Sword & Sorcery ideas getting worked on. But one day in the future, I might come back to this and give it a try. I think it’s a really cool idea.

Another thing that came to my mind recently was that in space industry, food supplies would be a major factor that usually gets ignored by most sci-fi. And I just happen to be studying to become an agricultural engineer, with a strong current interest in industrial in-door growing facilities. Maybe instead of mining, my family business should work in vegetables for deep space colonies instead of mining. I actually know a lot more about this stuff and it might make the setting feel more fresh. (Pun absolutely intended.)

The Stars are Right

“That is not dead which can eternal lie, and with strange eons even death may die.”

There seems to be a whisper on the winds, and a smell in the air. Still barely noticed, but anywhere you look where people go to talk about Sword & Sorcery, there seems to be an itching or a hunger for  more tales of both the heroic and the eldritch.

Appreciation for Robert Howard remains unbroken, and Conan is still a name that seems to bring another movie, RPG, or videogame to the market every year. Fritz Leiber and Michael Moorcock are still being discussed, and you will find many who caution not to forget Karl Wagner.

But it has been a long time since the last, or should we say most recent hurrah of Sword & Sorcery. In our times, it seem to mostly live on in curation of the classics and analysis of the Old Masters. A worth cause above reproach, but there is only so much of their works to read and eventually you’ve read it all. And there remains a craving for more.

In recent years there appears to have been a realization that we can not simply create more, but would need to create something new. We want writers to Robert Howard, but we can not tread in his footsteps. Particularly in recent months I’ve come across more and more voices that writers aspiring to create new Sword & Sorcery tales can not tie themselves down to the tales of Robert Howard and the aesthetics of Frank Frazetta. Those works already exist. Everyone remembers Conan, but who would really call himself a fan of Thongor, Brak, or Kothar? It was tried in the late 60s and failed, and it would fail just the same today.

As the late Romantic composer Gustav Mahler said “Tradition is not the worship of ashes, but passing on the fire.” And thoughts like these seem to have become more frequent in recent months.

4 Things Sword and Sorcery Needs to Improve to Become More Popular

A Passion for Sword and Sorcery

Sword-and-sorcery and the problem of Robert E. Howard

The Scale of Sword & Sorcery (or Why Conan Doesn’t Suck)

Robert E. Howard Changed My Life and Continues to Inspire Me

It has been over 30 years since campy B-Movies send Sword & Sorcery to its crypt and permanently cemented its reputation as juvenile trash.

Maybe the time has finally come to break the seals and open that crypt again.

Appropriate Diversity and why “Historical Accuracy” is (mostly) Bullshit

Diversity in media is a subject where whatever you do, someone will complain that you’re not doing it right. Either your work has not enough diversity and you’re a discriminating bigot, or the diversity in your work is a form of cultural appropriation. You really have only two options: Cultural appropriation or cultural segregation. I think much more often than not, any such discussion is missing the point.

There really are two different diversities that need to be looked at separately. A diversity in works, and a diversity of works. Most time people talk about diversity in media, they seem to be talking about diversity in works. “Does this work have sufficient amounts of women, blacks, and Asians and does it have positive depictions of other minority characters?” And I don’t think this is the right question to ask. We don’t need black vikings any more than we need an English samurai, and we don’t need women fighting in the trenches of World War I. Looking at a viking story, a samurai story, or a World War 1 story and counting the number of characters from various demographic groups is not only pointless, it also gives plenty of ammunition to dipshits who argue that any diversity is stupid and bad.

I think what is much more important is that we have a diversity of works. I don’t have any problems with works that have a mono-cultural or mono-ethnic cast of characters if these works are set in places with little cultural and ethnic diversity. Just squeezing in token minority characters isn’t doing anyone any good. If you are interested in seeing diverse representations, what we really need is a market that provides us with works set in diverse places, made by diverse creators. I don’t know about actual numbers, but in my perception of books, movies, and TV in the fantasy and science fiction genres, it feels like 80% of creators are white American or English men, 15% are white American or English women, and the final 5% is everyone else. I don’t have any problems with any creators setting their works in places and cultures that are familiar to them and in which they feel confident to make things up that are respectful to the issues within those places and cultures. The real problem that I am seeing is that the international entertainment market is set up in a way that strongly favors certain rather narrow groups of creators. The people who create the kind of content the market demands. Which the market demands because it’s the kind of content that audiences are used to.

The thing is that it is very easy to pick one specific work from one specific creator and say “this work is almost entirely white men!” That’s not really addressing the actual problem, but where do you want to point your finger when you want to criticize a global industry for long-term statistical imbalances? What address do you send your strongly worded letter to, and what event do you complain about? I think that’s the reason why we mostly see people barking up the wrong tree. Unfortunately, there is very little that any individual can do about that. But occasionally you see efforts being made. I don’t watch superhero movies, but Black Panther seems to be just the perfect example of what I mean with diversity of works. It’s a fantastic story set in an African country with the completely appropriate African-dominated cast of characters. That’s the kind of works that I think bring diversity to world of mainstream entertainment that is appropriate to their own content. That’s what I want to see more of.

However, recently I’ve also started to gain a new perspective on diversity in works. There certainly is a place for it and you can have, and should have, a considerable amount of diversity even in a viking story or in a story set in a German trench in World War I. But I believe that when we’re talking about diversity, we’re still instinctively thinking about the representation of black characters in works set in the contemporary United States. I feel like this is where it really started that people think about diversity in media. People complained rightfully that most works set in 20th century America do not accurately reflect the reality of the setting and that considerable portions of the population were deliberately erased from the picture. And from my outside perspective here in Germany, that’s still an issue for a lot of people. But I think there is a big mistake in equating “Diversity” with “ethnic Diversity”.

There are many settings in the contemporary world, from history, or in fictional places that really just don’t have much ethnic diversity going on. At least not in ways that are immediately visible and reflect the multi-ethnic population of the United States. A medieval Norwegian village might very well have considerable numbers of Finish, Irish, and Slavic slaves. That’s a form of historically accurate ethnic diversity, but in a movie you couldn’t tell them apart from the Norwegian and Danish slaves, so we don’t consider that to be a portrayal of diversity. And I don’t see that as a problem either.

However, and I think that’s really important, even in a medieval Norwegian village that has no foreign slaves, not everyone is the same. Not everyone in this village is a physically and mentally fit man in prime fighting age. There are also the women, and the old, the sick, the mad and feebleminded, and various other people who don’t fit the ideal of the group that is in power. Every village would have them. Lots of them. Considerably more than the number of warriors in their prime. If this is your setting, all these people deserve to be included. It is completely historically accurate to have them in the story. It actually would be grossly inacurate to keep them out of the picture. In the stories they tell about themselves, the brave battle bros of course dominate everything and do almost anything that is relevant to the story. But they still have to interact with the rest of the people around them.

If you’re a white European man like me, and only feel confident to write fantasy in a setting based on medieval Europe about the activities of medieval European men without grossly misrepresenting other cultures, I think that’s perfectly fine. It is not your duty to create an ethnically diverse setting with various populations inspired by Asian and African cultures, or to transplant characters from other cultures into your historical setting. There are millions of Asian and African writers who will be perfectly confident to represent such characters and cultures in fitting and appropriate ways. (That they have a harder time finding an international audience is another issue, but not something you can do anything about with the work you’re writing.) Some people will complain about that, but some people will take offense regardless of what you write. But even then you can be expected to acknowledge the diversity of people that exist in your mono-ethnic setting.

The State of Sword & Sorcery

A few years ago it seemed like a couple of people were making attempts to bring back Sword & Sorcery, with the release of a few new anthologies. Now it looks like nothing came of that, and I think in part that’s because those anthologies were not very good. I mostly hated them, really not being what was looking for and seeing in the old classics.

So I have come to the conclusion that Sword & Sorcery at this point is clearly dead. And it has been since the 80s. At least as new releases are concerned. Of course, the old classics are all still around and they are still great, and fans still love and reread them. Just like the skeleton of the king in his tomb that is discovered by Conan, Sword & Sorcery may be long dead, but it’s still magnificent in all it’s glory.

And of course, it does not have to stay dead. Fans waiting for someone to come along and bring us new Sword & Sorcery didn’t work out. Just saying that you want it does not make it happen. If Sword & Sorcery fans want to read new tales of the classic style, it is Sword & Sorcery fans who will have to write them. Who else could? Commercial writers who spot an abandoned niche and think there might be some money to make? They might produce something and declare it Sword & Sorcery, but it will only have the spirit of the old classics if the spirit of the classics is inside them. Sure, the first attempts will probably be pretty bad, but with practice and dedication results will improve with time.

My new writing space.

“That is not dead which can eternal lie, and with strange aeons even death may die.”

Remember, remember, it’s again November

What better time to get off my bum (or rather on my bum) and actually start putting some words down again.

I’m not going to do the whole Nanowrimo game, but it seems like a good opportunity to finally get something done. And I very much doubt getting anywhere close to the 50,000 words. But we’ll see.

I am actually going to try tackling my Awesome Future Novel Idea #5: Scouts of the Eldritch Wilds. Though I don’t think it’s going to be a novel, but rather something more episodic like classic Sword & Sorcery series or the first two books of The Witcher.